Sorry for the totally unoriginal blog post title but recently I’ve come across some amazing, interesting as well dubious stats pertaining to anything internet, social media or Web 2.0.

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This sure doesn’t fall in the same category as I’ve mentioned above but it intrigued me a bit more about the state of things around us i.e. “All Things Web“.

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Adam Singer has come collected some amazing social media, Web 2.0, crowdsourcing and internet statistics there is around us.

Google search stats:

  • 1,000,000,000,000 (one trillion) – approximate number of unique URLs in Google’s index (source)
  • 2,000,000,000 (two billion) – very rough number of Google searches daily (source)
  • $110,000,000 – approximately amount of money lost by Google annually due to the “I’m Feeling Lucky” button (source)
  • $39.96 – the average cost per click for the phrase “consolidation of school loans” in AdWords (source:  keyword tool)
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and few more

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Wikipedia stats

  • 2,695,205 – the number of articles in English on Wikipedia
  • 684,000,000 – the number of visitors to Wikipedia in the last year
  • 75,000 – the number of active contributors to Wikipedia
  • 10,000,000 – the number of total articles in Wikipedia in all languages
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and few more… (source)

YouTube stats

  • 70,000,000 – number of total videos on YouTube  (March 2008)
  • 200,000 – number of video publishers on YouTube (March 2008)
  • 100,000,000 – number of YouTube videos viewed per day (this stat from 2006 is the most recent I could locate)
  • 2 minutes 46.17 seconds – average length of video
  • 412.3 years – length in time it would take to view all content on YouTube (March 2008)
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(sources here, here and here)

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and few more

Blogosphere stats

  • 133,000,000 – number of blogs indexed by Technorati since 2002
  • 346,000,000 – number of people globally who read blogs (comScore March 2008)
  • 900,000 – average number of blog posts in a 24 hour period
  • 81 – number of languages represented in the blogosphere
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source

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and few more

Twitter stats

  • 1,111,991,000 – number of Tweets to date (see an up to the minute count here)
  • 3,000,000 – number of Tweets/day(March 2008) (from TechCrunch)
  • 63% – percentage of Twitter users that are male (from Time)

and few more

Facebook stats

  • 150,000,000 – number of active users
  • 170 – number of countries/territories that use Facebook
  • 35 – number of different languages used on Facebook
  • 2,600,000,000 – number of minutes global users in aggregate spend on Facebook daily

source

and few more

Digg stats

  • 236,000,000 – number of visitors attracted annually by 2008 (according to a Compete survey)
  • 56% – percentage of Digg’s frontpage content allegedly controlled by top 100 users
  • 36,925 – number of Diggs the most popular story in the last 365 days has received (see story here)

and few more

After all this, one question [as I asked in my last blog post too]- Are these numbers scalable to the point where it can trickle into $dollars? Do we see a viable Web 2.0 revenue model with all these stats? I know Twitter haven’t, Digg struggling, Facebook trying it heart out…

Please correct me or put me into light if I’m making a wrong assumption!

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